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The Red Zone

MARKETING IS LIKE ALGEBRA

By Allan Colman

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MARKETING IS LIKE ALGEBRA

Newer partners, senior assoicates and even third-years have been given their marching orders -- seek out new opportunities, pursue leads, get in front of prospects and close those deals. As in the Marco/Polo kids game, start popping up whenever and wherever there are prospects.

A few of the basic business development tools we find simplest to implement for our clients are discussed below and in following posts. They are designed for firm leadership which must take a strong role in making it all happen and ensure follow up is a constant.

Marketing IS like algebra. Keep this overarching theme in mind. Find a formula that works for each attorney, help them refine it when needed, and keep using it. One size does not fit all. Marketing should be tailored according to personality, needs of the firm and needs of the client.

One tactic that works for one won't necessarily work for another. In our work wiht clients the tools are simple, easy to implement and produce measurable results.

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