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The Red Zone

ASK FOR BUSINESS

By allan colman, www.closersgroup.com

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ASK FOR BUSINESS

When was the last time you asked clients for new business? On the surface, that question may seem a bit silly. After all, asking for business once a company has signed on with your firm may feel a bit redundant. But consider this: asking for more work on a regular basis is a solid client retention tactic that could lead to botton-line dividends.

Think business generation and value. If the new project involves work in a fledgling practice area your firm wants to promote, use warm relations with your client to persuade them to take a chance on your firm. Sweeten the deal and negotiate a lower fee for a set time period - perhaps three to six months -so the client can gain confidence in your firm's ability to handle the project.

Next column will discussing aligning your interests with the client's.

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