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EMPLOYMENT LAW STRATEGIST

January 2013

CA Workplace Religious Freedom Act

Harbinger of Things to Come?

By Rosanna Sattler and Laura Otenti

Employers often are faced with tricky legal dilemmas when employees ask to display religious symbols and take time off for religious observance. The most common religious request by retail employees is time off for a religious holiday, followed by requests to be excused from a dress code. Recent developments in both legislation and case law suggest that employers should only deny a religious accommodation when it would cause a quantifiable undue burden.

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