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INTERNET LAW & STRATEGY

March 2008

Disrupting the Lawyer Ratings Paradigm

A Look At a New Client Input System

By Joseph M. Campos

For nearly 150 years, clients’ opinions about their lawyers have been relegated to word of mouth. Information passed on in this manner is not recorded in any organized way and is therefore not available to the general public. In that time, the only organized source of information about lawyers came from lawyers themselves. All of that is now changing in a rapid, dramatic and explosive fashion, opening new channels and communities of information for legal services consumers, and creating exciting marketing and business development opportunities for lawyers and law firms.

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