Law Journal Newsletters

An ALM Website

NY FAMILY LAW MONTHLY

December 2007

Interpreting and Applying the Hague Convention

Part One of a Two-Part Article

By Bari Brandes Corbin and Evan B. Brandes

The Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction aims to protect children from being wrongfully removal or retained in a country other than their own and to establish procedures to ensure their prompt return to their country of habitual residence. Laudable though these goals are, they are subject to the nuances of the interpretations given to the law in the numerous courts around the world. How the courts of this and other countries deal with the various aspects of the Hague Convention can be cause for confusion even for experts in the field, let alone for the attorney who deals with very few of these cases.

Log In

Subscribers: Log in below to read the full story

Already subscribe but haven't registered for all the benefits of the website?

Subscribe

Click below to subscribe to
NY FAMILY LAW MONTHLY

Subscribe

Pay-Per-View

You can purchase this article for $20.00
Click below

Purchase Article

ARTICLES FROM RELATED NEWSLETTERS

e-COMMERCE LAW & STRATEGY

Online Extra:

DOJ Releases Cybersecurity Best Practices

Dealing with cybersecurity in the United States is challenging for many reasons, but one of the most frequently cited pain points is the patchwork of laws governing the space. Depending on your corporation’s industry, consumer base and location, your legal requirements following a significant breach can change dramatically. The Department of Justice (DOJ) is now stepping up to help, setting a list of best practices organizations should bear in mind if and when they are…

FRANCHISING BUSINESS & LAW ALERT

Is It Time to Rebuild the U.S. Franchise Regulatory System?

If you took a snapshot of all the laws and regulations governing franchising in the United States in 1979, and then took another snapshot of all the laws and regulations governing franchising today, you would find them very similar. While the rest of the world, including franchising, has been dynamic and constantly changing, franchise regulation has been, essentially, static.

FRANCHISING BUSINESS & LAW ALERT

Are You Paying Your Employees By Commission?

Many retail and service employers try to simplify their payroll obligations by labeling certain employees as "commission" or "commission only." While federal law permits this practice in some circumstances, the rules are complicated and present many traps for the unwary. The bottom line is simple: Employers should approach this practice with caution and must be prepared to substantiate the applicability of the exemption to each employee.