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When Products Start Teaching Cybersecurity Process

New Nuix Cybersecurity Training and Certification Point to Pivot Not Only In Company But In Community At Large

Getting certifications from Nuix is no longer just about mastery of its engine. With a new certification coming to market next quarter, Nuix, like many in the ESI and forensic space (namely Guidance Software, now OpenText), is shifting gears and driving directly into the race for cybersecurity supremacy in an evolving and currently fractured technology marketplace.

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Getting certifications from Nuix is no longer just about mastery of its engine. With a new certification coming to market next quarter, Nuix, like many in the ESI and forensic space (namely Guidance Software, now OpenText), is shifting gears and driving directly into the race for cybersecurity supremacy in an evolving and currently fractured technology marketplace. Nuix’s heightened focus on security awareness training and cybersecurity software development and certification, however, does not mean it has left behind its core products or educational offerings.

Nuix is, by industry standards, a household name when it comes to electronic evidence data processing or forensic investigation and analysis. Nuix offers four primary silos of training and certification: 1) an e-discovery specialist; 2) a forensic investigator; 3) a Nuix engine API developer and, 4) soon, a cybersecurity certification. The first three are heavily focused on use of the tool, but stylistically, training classes are delineated by use case and less about a click test functionality.

Nuix takes pride in elements unique to how it delivers training and to whom. Professionals taking Nuix courses range from government officials and the Secret Service to practicing attorneys, paralegals, litigation support and corporate IT. This broad range of individuals reflects the breadth of applications and uses of Nuix technology as well as the diversity among its training staff.

Where Is Technology Heading?

What’s coming next from Nuix, though, points to a pivot in the overarching development of its technology and how and where this technology is being used, reflecting greater industry trends and professional demand. Quite simply, the pivot is toward cybersecurity.

The new Nuix cybersecurity certification in process is product-specific and will involve practical elements of the tool; however, the current offering provides broader educational components and in this case more open-sourced technology integration and exploration. According to Annie Oman, head of education, “Nuix has not traditionally focused on the theoretical elements of the industry in e-discovery and forensic investigations and instead, until now, has focused solely on master use of our tool.”

The cyber training now available is a slight departure from Nuix’s traditional approach and reflective of the approach Nuix is starting to take across the board. “If you are an ESI professional and you want to transition into the cyber world — you can do it with Nuix in every way,” says Oman. “We have teams of people that are not just focused on products but also on general cybersecurity education and awareness.”

Professors at Nuix include practitioners (who actually bill their time as information security consultants for Nuix as well as delivering training) in everything from incident response to threat analysis and detection to penetration testing and reverse malware engineering. There is a separate series of classes around the fundamentals of cyber, but elements of that course are included in the product class and certification process.

“You can’t dive into cyber certification on the tool without having some cyber fundamentals,” adds Oman. “It is not a prerequisite to take the Nuix general cybersecurity awareness training in order to qualify to take the Nuix certification class, but for newbies we recommend it.”

Training is delivered in a variety of channels and at varying price points. One of the primary mechanisms for delivery of education and training is in privately held on-site and online classes. “Clients certifying their teams generally want training in a private setting, particularly at law firms, federal agencies and with state and local governments,” says Oman. Nuix also group trains at its conference. There is also a public-facing training class schedule available online and executed in-person in various Nuix global offices.

For a less expensive option or for those who are active users and may not need a full training class, Nuix offers online self-guided training and course material documentation. “We want the barrier to entry to training with Nuix to be as minimal as possible for our users,” Oman said.

The departure from a solely product-focused training versus a broader educational training when it comes to cybersecurity is not just the Nuix approach. This important differentiation in vocational skills versus educational depth is where e-discovery hiring managers differ from cybersecurity hiring managers. Hiring managers in e-discovery and forensic investigations are more focused on talent having certification and tool proficiency first and foremost, so that they can begin billing (or saving on costs) immediately. Products are far less the focus when cybersecurity talent is examined on the open market.

Part of this trend results from recent rapid consolidation and commoditization of ESI service providers all using the same core standard of software tools, namely Relativity, Ipro, EnCase, FTK, Law, iCONECT and Nuix. These are the certifications employers look for first and foremost when evaluating skill sets and beginning the hiring process. Cybersecurity hiring managers are much more focused on certifications like the CISSP, CISA, CIMA, GIAC, CIPP or ISC far less geared to specific software applications and mastery of said tools and aimed at broader cyber processes and principles.

This trend, however, is bound to change. As cybersecurity begins its glacial maturation toward an inevitable consolidation and commoditization of its own, dominant products will emerge in the space, and those with the right tool-based skills will command a premium in compensation. Which specific tools that will one day monopolize, the cybersecurity world remain uncertain, but Nuix is undoubtedly positioning itself to be a front-runner in this race by first offering education that then leads to indoctrinating its students to its software.

***** Jared Coseglia is the founder and CEO of TRU Staffing Partners, and a member of our Board of Editors. He has over 13 years of experience placing thousands of professionals in e-discovery, litigation support, cybersecurity and broadly throughout legal and technology staffing.

 

The views expressed in the article are those of the authors and not necessarily the views of their clients or other attorneys in their firm.

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