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Avoiding Conflicts of Interest: Best Practices

Other than billing, there is virtually nothing lawyers dread more than checking, responding to, and resolving potential conflicts of interest. Exploring “conflicts” issues inevitably focuses on why a lawyer should not take on a new matter rather than how to get the business in the door. Left unidentified or unresolved, however, conflicts frequently result in huge costs and problems, far more than most attorneys imagine. Read More...

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INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY STRATEGIST

Internet 2.0: Jurisdictional Risks in Today’s Cyber World

With the explosion of the Internet in the last several decades, courts have struggled with whether tortious conduct on a website is expressly aimed at any, or all, of the forums in which the website can be viewed. Two recent Ninth Circuit cases expanded the reach of Internet jurisdiction and may carry significant implications.

THE CORPORATE COUNSELOR

Sarbanes Oxley And The Non-Public Subsidiary: A Non-Sequitur?

By now, corporate counselors are well acquainted with the fact that the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (SOX) and its whistleblower protections apply to publicly traded companies. What is less well known is that the Sarbanes-Oxley whistleblower protections can also apply to non-public subsidiaries of publicly traded companies. Although the Department of Labor Administrative Review Board noted that it has not addressed the issue at the appellate level, a number of OSHA Administrative Law Judges (who hear SOX whistleblower cases at the trial level) have done so, and their decisions uniformly hold that SOX can protect the employees of non-public subsidiaries of publicly traded companies under certain circumstances. Those decisions also provide practical guidance for corporate counselors who want to limit SOX coverage strictly to the publicly-traded parent.

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