• Features

    Implications of U.S. Supreme Court Justices' Comments During 'Slants' Trademark Dispute Oral Arguments

    Tony Mauro and Scott Graham

    Nearly 70 years after it became law, the U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments in January on whether §2(a) of the Lanham Act violates the First Amendment. The case, Lee v. Tam, focuses on the provision that forbids registration of trademarks that "disparage" people, institutions, beliefs or national symbols.

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  • Features

    Paul McCartney's Suit over Songs' Recapture Rights

    Stan Soocher and Scott Graham

    Paul McCartney has long wanted to reclaim ownership of his share of the copyrights to "Love Me Do," "Ticket to Ride" and numerous other Beatles hits he co-wrote with John Lennon. But the unfavorable December 2016 decision by a British judge in a copyright termination dispute involving the 1980's hitmakers Duran Duran raised some doubts — at least in the minds of Sony/ATV Music Publishing and its counsel — about whether the U.S. copyright law rights can supersede valid contracts assigning away musical rights and also prevent Paul McCartney from exercising his termination rights.

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  • Features

    New Hockey Team's Trademark Dispute Nothing New

    Elio F. Martinez Jr.

    What happens in Vegas does not necessarily stay in Vegas. Such was the recent ruling by the USPTO that denied registration of the trademarks "Las Vegas Golden Knights" and "Vegas Golden Knights" to the newest NHL franchise, due to their similarity to Golden Knights of the College of Saint Rose, a mark owned by a small college in Albany, NY.

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  • Features

    How Should Noise Ordinance Be Applied to This Music Venue?

    Samantha Joseph

    Noise ordinances are often the bane of live performances venues. A jazz brunch in Miami Beach has sparked litigation between the city and a cafe owner with an interesting twist over the constitutionality of the city's noise ordinance.

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  • Features

    A Look at the Trial Against Facebook over Video Game Technology

    Jenna Greene

    The social networking company is being sued by videogame maker ZeniMax Media, which says Oculus stole its technology. Facebook responded that Zenimax's story is nothing but a "fantasy" by a company that was "embarrassed" and "humiliated." It's worth taking a closer look at how each side is framing the fight.

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  • Columns & Departments

    Bit Parts

    Stan Soocher

    Failure to Geoblock User Uploads of Movies Isn't Ground for Establishing Personal Jurisdiction Over Web Company
    Letter of Intent For Production of Film Wasn't Binding
    Use of Catcalling Footage in Ad Doesn't Result in Viable False Endorsement Claim by Actress

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