Law Journal Newsletters

An ALM Website

FAQs

Q: What is LJN?
Q: How do I subscribe?
Q: Do you accept bylined or contributed material?
Q: Do you accept advertising?
Q: What if I have a question about an article?


Q: What is LJN?
A: LJN — Law Journal Newsletters — is the newsletter publishing arm of ALM, publishers of The National Law Journal, The American Lawyer and legal newspapers of record throughout the U.S. For a list of newsletter titles, click on the Newsletters link in the left-hand navigation bar. All of the newsletters are 8 pages and are published monthly.

Q: How do I subscribe?
A: Go to the Subscribe page and click on Subscribe under the appropriate newsletter title. Or contact Customer Service. Subscriptions are renewed annually.

Q: Do you accept bylined or contributed material?
A: Yes. The newsletters' content consists of articles written and contributed by attorneys or other professionals who are "in the trenches" in a particular practice area or industry. For article submission guidelines, contact the Editor for the appropriate newsletter, found on the Contact Us page.

Q: Do you accept advertising?
A: No. The newsletters do not contain paid advertising. Sponsorship opportunities are available, contact our Editorial Director for more information. For information on advertising on our Web site, contact our Advertising Department.

Q: What if I have a question about an article?
A: The author’s name is listed at the beginning of each article and may have an e-mail address in the bio section at the end of the article. Or contact the Editor for the appropriate newsletter, found on the Contact Us page.

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