• Features

    He, Cuevas, and the Law of Remittitur in New Jersey

    Robert E. Spitzer

    Despite the established purpose of a compensatory damage award, there are occasions when a verdict is so excessive it could only have been arrived at in an effort to punish, rather than to compensate. In those instances of a "runaway" jury award, there are two generally recognized forms of relief available to address the excessive verdict: a new trial as to damages only, or remittitur.

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  • Features

    Will the CT Supreme Court Reinvent Design Defect Law?

    Jeremy H. D'Amico and Michael A. D'Amico

    Part Two of a Two-Part Article
    A continuation of the discussion regarding the fact that the Connecticut Supreme Court is currently considering whether the state should abandon its traditional strict product liability standard for design defect claims and replace it with section 2(b) of the Restatement (Third) of Torts, which requires plaintiffs to prove the manufacturer's foreseeability of harm, and prove the effectiveness of a reasonable alternative design in order to recover damages for product-caused injuries.

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  • Features

    Snakes in the Jury Box: The 'Reptile Method' and How To Defeat It

    Marilyn Moberg, Alexis Rochlin, Alayna Jehle and Rick Fuentes

    This article provides an overview of the "reptile method," why it can be successful if not rebutted, and some ideas on how a defendant can present a more fulsome story about its good conduct, actual legal obligations and the facts to the jury.

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  • Columns & Departments

    Case Notes

    In the case of Caltagirone v. Cephalon, Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas Judge Denis P. Cohen has granted the plaintiff the right to subpoena documents concerning pharmaceuticals manufacturer Cephalon from the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern Dirstrict of Pennsylvania. Here’s an analysis of the ruling.

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