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Bankruptcy

Sixth Circuit Trims Bank's Good-Faith Defense to Fraudulent Transfer Claims

Part Two of a Two-Part Article

Last month, we began our discussion of what constitutes a good-faith defense to a fraudulent transfer claim with an initial examination of the recent Sixth Circuit opinion in Meoli v. Huntington Nat'l Bank. We continue the analysis this month by focusing on sub-issues presented in Meoli, including the question of notice, the proper test of good faith, and an analysis of whether banks may be considered "transferees" with respect to ordinary bank deposits.

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Last month, we began our discussion of what constitutes a good-faith defense to a fraudulent transfer claim with an initial examination of the recent Sixth Circuit opinion in Meoli v. Huntington Nat’l Bank, 2017 U.S. App. LEXIS 2248, *28 (Feb. 8, 2017). We continue the analysis this month by focusing on sub-issues presented in Meoli, including the question of notice, the proper test of good faith, and an analysis of whether banks may be considered “transferees” with respect to ordinary bank deposits. In addition, we discuss a recent Ninth Circuit preference decision that offers a mistaken analysis of the transfer issue.

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