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International Law Mergers and Acquisitions Regulation White Collar Crime

Beyond the FCPA: M&A Due Diligence Under the Expanded DOJ Corporate Enforcement Policy

Over the past few years, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) has taken notable steps to advance the axiom that the business community and law enforcement are “partners, not adversaries.” DOJ has now taken its guidance one step further, announcing that the FCPA Corporate Enforcement Policy would apply to all potential wrongdoing discovered by an acquirer in the course of a merger or acquisition, not just to FCPA violations.

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Over the past few years, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) has taken notable steps to advance the axiom that the business community and law enforcement are “partners, not adversaries.” In November 2017, DOJ promulgated its Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) Corporate Enforcement Policy, which is incorporated into the Justice Manual (formerly known as the United States Attorneys Manual). The FCPA Corporate Enforcement Policy was intended to promote fairness and predictability in FCPA corporate enforcement and to incentivize self-reporting. Through a series of policy announcements, the DOJ expanded and clarified the reach of the FCPA Corporate Enforcement Policy — first as “nonbinding guidance” in corporate criminal cases outside the context of the FCPA, and later as applied to successor FCPA liability in mergers and acquisitions (M&A).

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