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How to use this search engine

You can use any of the three search methods that operate on lawjournalnews.com’s search engine – Boolean, set logic and natural language. Read below for a brief guide to each:

Boolean

This common search method lets you easily combine terms by using programming devices called "operators" such as "AND," "OR," "AND NOT.” The Law Journal Newsletters search engine uses this method as the default search system, and assumes the operator “AND” when more than one term is being searched.

AND requires all terms appear in a record.
OR retrieves records with either term.
AND NOT excludes terms.

Parentheses may be used to sequence operations and group words. Parenthesis MUST be used when searching using the operator “OR”.

Wild Card Character

For broad searches, you may use an asterisk (*) to represent multiple characters. For example: computer* would return items such as computer, computers, computerized, computeristic, etc. Please note: A "*" may be used only at the end of a search term.

Set logic

Set logic method is based on the mathematical concept of sets. The default behavior of the search is to locate an intersection (or 'AND') of every element within a query. This means that the query; "procurement regulation interface" is the equivalent to the boolean query: "procurement AND regulation AND interface."

Set logic operators

  • '-' (without)
    The '-'(minus) is the most commonly used logic symbol. It means the answer should EXCLUDE references to that item.
  • '+' (mandatory)
    The '+'(plus) symbol in front of a search item means that the answer MUST INCLUDE that item.

Sets (or lists) of things are specified by placing the elements within parenthesis, separated by commas. Example: (procurement,regulation,interface)

Example Finds
procurement regulation interface procurement with regulation and interface
procurement regulation -interface procurement with regulation without interface

Natural Language Query

This method is based on a close approximation to how people normally phrase questions in spoken communication. You may enter a query in the form of a sentence or question. Key words and phrases within your query will be identified by the search engine and extraneous words deleted from the search.

Example:
What is the state of the art in text retrieval?
The software will search for:
state of the art AND text AND retrieval.

Search parameters

You may enter specific parameters on the search engine input fields, or you can leave them blank. If you do not change or set the various search parameters, the default search is for all time periods, in all print categories of Law Journal Newsletters, and ranked with the most recent first.

Document relevance

The Law Journal Newsletters search engine is “tuned” to locate search terms within a specified proximity of each other, to achieve the most relevant result possible. Most search queries will produce the best results if the default setting, “Medium,” is used.

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From Our Blogs

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INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY STRATEGIST

A Blurry Distinction with a Huge Difference: Commercial vs. Non-Commercial Speech

Imagine the following two scenarios, and try to figure out what the real difference is. First, your competitor blatantly lies in its advertising about the effectiveness of its products; second, your competitor blatantly lies to a reporter about the effectiveness of its products, and the reporter publishes the lies in an article or in a magazine. It seems like the same situation, but it is not. With the first, you could sue for false advertising because the advertisement is “commercial” speech, whereas with the second, you cannot because the magazine article is “non-commercial” speech. A similar difference is presented if a newspaper uses a picture of a celebrity without the celebrity’s consent to highlight a news article, as opposed to a company using the same celebrity picture in a print advertisement, in the same newspaper, to promote the company. A breach of the celebrity’s right of publicity claim is not available against the newspaper because the news article is “non-commercial,” but is available against the company because the print advertisement is “commercial.” The rationale for both is that while the First Amendment fully protects “non-commercial” speech, it protects “commercial’ speech in a significantly limited way.

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