• Business Crimes Bulletin

    In the Courts

    Kate Monks

    The Ninth Circuit affirmed the majority of an $11 million jury verdict brought by a whistleblower who claimed that his company fired him for raising concerns about possible FCPA violations.

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  • Business Crimes Bulletin

    Supreme Court Ties SEC’s Hands in Whistleblower Case

    Janice G. Inman

    With its decision in Digital Realty v. Somers, the U.S. Supreme Court dealt a blow to companies interested in learning of their own securities violations before the government gets the heads-up. The case’s outcome means whistleblowers who might have reported violations internally will be incentivized to bypass their own companies’ compliance mechanisms in favor of immediate reporting to the SEC.

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  • The Intellectual Property Strategist

    Takeaways from the Swift End to Waymo v. Uber

    Ross Todd

    The details might not be quite as dramatic as they were in Waymo v. Uber, but lawyers expect trade secrets to continue to be a fertile source for litigation.

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  • Business Crimes Bulletin

    The False Claims Act Seal: The DOJ's Position

    Andrew W. Schilling and Megan E. Whitehill

    Part Two of a Three-Part Article

    Notwithstanding the absence of an explicit gag order in the statute, the DOJ takes the position that, even if the relator properly files the case under seal at the outset, that relator can later “breach the seal,” and be subject to judicial sanction, if he or she discloses the existence of the qui tam to others.

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  • Business Crimes Bulletin

    The False Claims Act Seal: Does It Bind and Gag the Defendant?

    Andrew W. Schilling and Megan E. Whitehill

    Part One of a Two-Part Article

    A company that finds itself the target of a federal fraud investigation often faces the fraught question of whether it may, or even must, disclose the existence of that investigation to third parties, such as its investors, shareholders, major creditors, or insurers. The question can be even more complicated if that investigation is being pursued under the False Claims Act and arises as the result of a sealed qui tam complaint.

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  • Business Crimes Bulletin

    Internal Whistleblowers

    Matthew B. Schiff and Kathryn C. Nadro

    SCOTUS Review of Dodd-Frank to Change the Landscape

    In June, the Supreme Court granted certiorari in Digital Realty Trust Inc. v. Somers, to review a Ninth Circuit decision regarding SEC whistleblowing protections. The Court's ruling is highly anticipated, as it will clarify the landscape for whistleblower protections.

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  • The Corporate Counselor

    Follow Up on False Claims Act Actions

    Jacqueline C. Wolff and Benjamin J. Wolfert

    The authors discuss several steps to take in order to avoid the pitfalls that could accompany lengthy exposure vis-à-vis state false claims actions.

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  • Employment Law Strategist

    Internal Whistleblowers

    Matthew B. Schiff and Kathryn C. Nadro

    Scotus Review of Dodd-Frank to Change the Landscape

    On June 26, 2017, the Supreme Court granted certiorari in Digital Realty Trust Inc. v. Somers, to review a U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit decision regarding SEC whistleblowing protections. The Court's ruling is highly anticipated, as it will clarify the landscape for whistleblower protections.

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  • Business Crimes Bulletin

    Follow Up on False Claims Act Actions

    Jacqueline C. Wolff and Benjamin J. Wolfert

    This article discusses what you can do to mitigate against the risk inherent in prolonged exposure. While a 50-state survey is beyond the scope of this article, the authors identify issues that should be on the forefront of your mind if faced with potential state false claims act liability.

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  • Business Crimes Bulletin

    Escobar's Effect on False Claims Act Qui Tam Actions

    Danielle Corcione, Daniel Wenner, Robert Marasco and Jennifer Mitchell

    The Supreme Court, in Universal Health Servs., Inc. v. United States ex rel. Escobar, altered the landscape for FCA litigation. In this case, the Supreme Court instructed lower courts to scrutinize the materiality of the false statements to the government's decision to pay a claim; in doing so, the Court raised the bar for successful prosecution of qui tam claims.

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