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Copyright Royalty Board Gets E-Filing System

The Library of Congress' Copyright Royalty Board, the panel of three judges who set copyright royalty rates and settle related disputes, announced the launch of an electronic filing and case management system in an effort to streamline its manual and cumbersome case management processes.

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The Library of Congress’ Copyright Royalty Board, the panel of three judges who set copyright royalty rates and settle related disputes, announced the launch of an electronic filing and case management system in an effort to streamline its manual and cumbersome case management processes.

Named eCRB (electronic Copyright Royalty Board) (https://app.crb.gov/), the system was developed by NIC Inc., a technology provider that designs digital solutions for federal, state and local governments. Like other government e-filing solutions, eCRB looks to automate uploading case documents via a dedicated website and enable tracking of case progress in real-time.

Laura Johnson, NIC’s general manager, explains that to use eCRB, one first needs to register for an online account and pay a filing fee electronically before uploading case documents. If the case is approved for review by the Copyright Royalty Board, users can use eCRB’s dashboard to get status updates on the case or set up alerts that notify them when a case progresses to another phase.

In a statement announcing the system’s release, Suzanne Barnett, chief judge at the Copyright Royalty Board, noted, for example, the eCRB will be instrumental in speeding up “the claims process for cable and satellite royalty funds.”

This is in no small part because, before the launch of the new system, the Copyright Royalty Board’s filing and notification processes was heavily reliant on postal mail services and paper filings. “Prior to this digital service, filers were required to submit five paper copies of their filing, and the Copyright Royalty Board organized these packages into large stacks of binders,” Johnson said. “Filing fee payments were accepted via paper checks received by mail.”

The system, she added, is also hosted on a “FedRAMP-certified cloud computing environment” and “rigorously tested against hundreds of the Federal Information Security Management Act (FISMA) security controls” for government-mandated data security standards.

Though e-filing is relatively new to federal agencies like the Copyright Royalty Board, it has fast become a staple in local and state court systems around the country.

***** Rhys Dipshan writes for Legaltech News, an ALM sibling publication of this newsletter in which this article also appeared.

The views expressed in the article are those of the authors and not necessarily the views of their clients or other attorneys in their firm.

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