Follow Us

Law.com Subscribers SAVE 30%

Call 855-808-4530 or email [email protected] to receive your discount on a new subscription.

Intellectual Property Litigation Trademarks

Can Consumer Products Be ‘Expressive Works’?

In a case that may have significant implications for the ability of mark holders to enforce their marks against many types of products, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit is now considering whether consumer products such as sneakers can be considered “expressive works” to which First Amendment protections can apply.

X

Thank you for sharing!

Your article was successfully shared with the contacts you provided.

The Lanham Act protects trademarks and trade dress by creating civil liability for unauthorized uses of valid marks and trade dress that are likely to cause consumer confusion. The Act’s protections do not apply, however, to speech that is protected by the First Amendment. In a case that may have significant implications for the ability of mark holders to enforce their marks against many types of products, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit is now considering whether consumer products such as sneakers can be considered “expressive works” to which First Amendment protections can apply. Vans v. MSCHF Prod. Studio, No. 22-CV-2156 (WFK) (RML), 2022 WL 1446681 (E.D.N.Y. April 29, 2022), argued, No. 22-1006 (2d Cir. Sept. 28, 2022). We report here on that case.

To continue reading,
become a free ALM digital reader

Benefits include:

*May exclude premium content

Read These Next