Follow Us

Law.com Subscribers SAVE 30%

Call 855-808-4530 or email GroupSales@alm.com to receive your discount on a new subscription.

Cybersecurity Privacy Technology Media and Telecom United States Supreme Court

Online Extra: Just How Far Will the Supreme Court’s 'Carpenter' Opinion Reverberate?

The ruling restricting the collection of historical cell site location information (CSLI) without a warrant aims to be narrow in scope, but legal experts argue it may have repercussions for years to come.

Print
X

Thank you for sharing!

Your article was successfully shared with the contacts you provided.

The U.S. Supreme Court’s 5-4 decision in Carpenter v. United States, ruling that the collection of historical cell-site location information (CSLI) during criminal investigation is a search under the Fourth Amendment, was seen as a vindication for those arguing for higher privacy standards. CSLI data allows law enforcement authorities to roughly estimate the location of a cell-phone holder over potentially long periods of time.

The views expressed in the article are those of the authors and not necessarily the views of their clients or other attorneys in their firm.

Read These Next